Dave Ramsey’s 7 Baby Steps

I was first introduced to Dave Ramsey in 2009, when I was still in college. My roommate at the time let me borrow her copy of The Total Money Makeover. Even though I had always been an avid saver and didn’t have any credit card debt, I wanted to learn more about money.

I didn’t retain a lot of the information I read at the time, but I remember agreeing with most of Dave’s principles. The book also helped me realize the importance of giving, which I had never thought much about before.

After reading that book, I didn’t think about Dave Ramsey or his 7 Baby Steps again until very recently.

At the end of the last year, my husband and I bought our third rental property. And when I finally filled out a net worth statement and realized just how much debt we had once we combined all three mortgages (plus a HELOC), it was a rude awakening to say the least.

Even though our net worth is still very much positive thanks to increasing home values, we don’t like having so much debt, or any debt, to be honest.

So shortly after we opened escrow, we started listening to The Dave Ramsey Show every day. Listening to all the Debt Free Screams has inspired us to finally take his 7 Baby Steps seriously and make a plan.

We are technically in Baby Step 2 because we have small car loan. But we should be able to jump to Baby Step 4 & 6 within the next 2 months (we’re skipping Baby Step 5 because don’t have kids yet) and here’s why:

Even though we have the cash to pay off the car, we are in the middle of a major home remodel for the new rental property we just bought. And since home remodels often come with expensive surprises (like suddenly all the pipes need to be replaced!), we want to have enough cash on hand to cover any of those surprises, rather than resort to borrowing more money.

Once the home remodel is compete, we should have enough cash remaining to pay off the car (Baby Step 2) and have a 3-6 month emergency fund in place (Baby Step 3).

My husband and I are currently saving about 10% of our gross income into our 401(k)s but as soon as the home remodel is done, we will bump it up to 15% (Baby Step 4). We will also be redoing our budget to make sure we can pay extra principle on our mortgages & HELOC to get out of debt faster (Baby Step 6).

Based off our current income and expenses, we are projected to be in Baby Step 6 for over 25 years (yikes!). But by reducing our expenses immediately and increasing our incomes over time, our goal is to get out of Baby Step 6 in 15 years or less. The average family takes 5-7 years to finished Baby Step 6 but since we have 3 rental properties, 15 years might be more realistic.

If all goes well, we should be financially independent the same time we pay off our last mortgage.

I know things won’t work out this way exactly because, you know, life happens. But that’s our plan and if we’re delayed by a few years, we would still be out of debt a heck of a lot sooner than if we had no plan at all.

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2 thoughts on “Dave Ramsey’s 7 Baby Steps

  1. Pingback: Our Baby Step Update – Baby Steps 2 & 3 Complete! | Millennial Finance

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